Giclee Prints

Giclees are fine art prints - sometimes the artist will also add fresh paint to the print

The difference between fine art prints (Giclee) and (Cole Custom) paintings:

Giclees are fine art prints that are produced on bright white, fine poly-cotton blend, matte canvas using the latest generation giclee printing technology. The quality of the giclee print rivals traditional silver-halide and gelatin printing processes and is commonly found in museums and art galleries in New York City at the Metropolitan Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Chelsea Galleries.

The giclee process involves the spraying of millions of acrylic ink droplets onto high quality, special canvas. The smooth transitions of color gradients make giclee prints appear much more realistic than other prints. Although our reproductions come in standard sizes, they can also be enlarged or modified as per your requirement. However, please note that the dimensions of the length and breadth of the original will need to be maintained in the same ratio. Changing the ratios would result in either a skewed or cropped reproduction; neither of which are desirable or available.

COLE CUSTOM PAINTINGS:
Mr. Cole, however actually creates new, real paintings (with real acrylic paint and real brushes on real canvas - or paper, in the case of pastels or watercolor) instead of flat prints. Using the photos that are provided by customers for those custom and commissioned paintings, means you get an actual and true 'original' while still offering the varying characteristics and color mixes that a painting offers (as opposed to a modified photo). This lends a quality to the print/painting that is truly unique and which very few artists ever bother with.

However it is Randy Cole's aim to get as many originals into as many homes as possible. There is simply nothing to compare with how daylight and room lighting plays off of original paint, very strongly setting it apart from flat, lifeless paper prints (unless we are talking about a pencil drawing or the like). In similar fashion he will also go over the surface of his pastel pieces as well, using a special fixative that allows him to rework the surface with real, vibrant pastel colors.

The artist at home working over one of his original Hot Rod paintings,